SST

Date

11/21/2020

Location

Day #

4

Ski Partners

Brian Yoder

Route

SST to the base of North Walton Peak

Weather

HSN24

Nil

HSN48

Nil

Precip

Nil

Sky

Clear

Winds

Light

Temps

35F @ 1pm

Ski Pen

3"

Weather Forecast

Sunny and calm

Avalanche Forecast

Rating

1,1,1

Hazard

Small persistent slabs possible on N-NE ATL

Most slopes are safe from avalanches, either due to a lack of snow or missing the necessary ingredients. North to northeast facing slopes near and above treeline are the few places where you can still find a stiffer slab resting over weaker snow near the ground. Many of these areas will have a windblown appearance, and the snow will be hard to penetrate. It may be hard to trigger an avalanche on these slopes, but if you do, it will likely break at the ground and sweep you off your feet. With numerous exposed rocks and ground hazards below, even taking a small ride could have dire consequences.

Snowpack Observations

The snowpack across the northern mountains is thin, and the avalanche danger remains Low (Level 1). Sunny slopes are trending back to bare ground, while shadier slopes are only holding continuous snow cover in more protected terrain features. Under these conditions, most slopes are safe from avalanches, and only a few isolated features need your attention.

Higher elevation slopes near and above treeline facing north to northeast are the remaining spots where you can trigger a small avalanche. You can find a stiffer slab resting above weaker snow grains from earlier in the season on these aspects. Even with a snowpack 1 to 2 feet deep, there remains a chance that any avalanche you trigger can do you harm. With thin snow coverage in the middle and lower parts of the path, taking even a small ride will likely bash you off of rocks and stumps below.

Riding Quality

Sketchy skiing on fast breakable crust. Average snow depth 6-10″.

Photos

Click to enlarge

Leave a Comment